Blog: Running Through My Mind
I read this today at the place I go if I want to research a subject, gather opinions, find out what people are interested in/what is bothering them or making them happy currently, or if I just can’t get off the sofa and there is nothing worth watching on TV; you may have guessed already, I am talking about Twitter.

Athletes eat and train, they don’t diet and exercise

19/04/2014
I read this today at the place I go if I want to research a subject, gather opinions, find out what people are interested in/what is bothering them or making them happy currently, or if I just can’t get off the sofa and there is nothing worth watching on TV; you may have guessed already, I am talking about Twitter.

A lot of the time, I read something on Twitter think, “oh, that’s” *insert relevant adjective here – funny/stupid/clever, for example, then move on. If I think it is particularly good, I may even go to the monumental effort of hitting the re-tweet button. Now you may not think that is much of an effort, but remember; at this point, I am half sitting, half lying on the sofa without the motivation to even change TV channels despite the fact that I have the remote in my lap, or, better still, get up and find a good book to read!

But, this one, in the words of many a new age hippy over the years, really seemed to “speak to me”.

Anyone who knows me will know that I have recently (in the last six months) got into running in a really big way. I do it to get out in the countryside, I do it for the health benefits, I do it for the stress relief and happy endorphins (my name is Karen Adams and I am a runners’ high addict), I do it because it makes me get off my backside and not watch whatever dross masquerades as entertainment on TV nowadays. I run for a lot of reasons, but most of all I do it because I love it.

I confess, losing a little weight along the way was appealing at the start, as some of my favourite clothes no longer fitted properly (ok, at all), but I didn’t anticipate losing almost 10 kilos in such a short space of time (that’s just over one and a half stone to those of you still stuck in a pre-metric world). I would have been happy with less than a third of that amount.

I therefore now ‘watch’ what I eat, but not in a calorie restrictive way, more in an attempt to ensure I get all the nutrition I need and sufficient calories not to lose any more weight. That may mean, however, that I turn down that jam doughnut someone kindly put on my desk because I know I have had my lunch and still need to get through a banana (for potassium), a yoghurt (for calcium and my daily bifidus-whatsidus-makes-your-tummy-happiness or whatever you call it), the homemade peanut butter and chia seed flapjack (for calories, but also protein and oats, which are so good for you) and 5 cups of tea (because I can’t function without them)! I just don’t know what a jam doughnut would add, aside from the calories, even if I were able to eat it on top of everything else – sure I like them, but I love my flapjack and it’s better for me.

Of course, this refusal to eat a jam doughnut when it’s a) free and b) going spare is perceived as me ‘being on a diet’ – why else would a normal, sane person refuse a doughnut?

Before you think I am some kind of saint when it comes to food, I should just add that I don’t always turn down the free food, particularly not if it comes covered in chocolate!

So, going back to the original reason for starting this blog post; this little snippet of wisdom struck a chord for me as I realised I am looking at food and nutrition as fuel to enable me to run (further, faster, in circles sometimes, though that last one is more metaphorical than literal).

Therefore: I eat to train….…therefore: I am an athlete.

So next time I am presented with some sugary, fatty, sweet treat I would rather not eat, I will simply tell my colleagues thank you, but I don’t want it because I am an athlete.

(Or maybe I won’t, as I don’t want my colleagues to hate me…)